Fantasy Rush: Spring Streaks

 Written by Kevin Jackman

 @kjackmansports, facebook.com/jackmansports, jackmansports@yahoo.com

If he’s hot, ride him for the first couple weeks. That’s what most fantasy experts will tell you, and quite frankly, I agree. I don’t care that Willie Bloomquist will single handedly lower my team’s street cred as long as he is producing, which he has at an astronomical rate (for him).

I told you guys that tips would be on the way and here is tip #1:

Do not listen to the crap from fellow owners that you will get by picking up unknown, hot players. If you can ride them effectively and recognize when they are going cold, go for it! The problem most fantasy owners have is infatuation, it is killer. Players on your team are simply things; don’t fall in love with them. Unless they were taken in the first 8 or 9 rounds, drop them if they go cold and put someone on your team that can help you out now. There is a fine line between potential and a roster dud.

For instance- if you spent a late round pick on Carlos Pena and you think he is still going to hit 40 home runs, than you’re insane. Funny thing is that Pena is still owned in 61% of Yahoo! Leagues. You would be better off picking up Mark Trumbo of the Angels who is having a very strong opening few weeks filling in for Kendry Morales. He is only owned in 10% of leagues! Even better is that he’s the tenth best first baseman so far, meaning he should be someone’s starter right now.

The moral? Pick up the hot man, drop the cold man and win the week at hand. Unless you are a season fantasy owner, don’t bother with potential.

Jackman

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One thought on “Fantasy Rush: Spring Streaks

  1. Bobby Mette says:

    I am going to have to disagree with you on this one. Yes, you can drop players you took later if they are not producing because the chances of someone picking them up are slim, and when/if they turn it on, then you make sure you’re the first one to pick them back up. When I say later, though, I mean way later. You mentioned the first 9 rounds you shouldn’t drop. I would go ahead and say the first 12 or so. If a player is going to help you for one week, then you could win that week. But, if you drop someone who has way more potential, then you risk not getting him back. I would much rather have someone that by the end of the year will have bigger numbers than a guy like Willie Bloomquist who will only produce “fantasy-wise” for a couple of weeks.

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